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Richard F. Teichgraeber III
  • Professor Of History
  • 2009-2010 CEPA Faculty Fellow
  •  
  • rteich@tulane.edu
  • Phone: (504) 862-3237
  •  
  • 303 Hebert Hall

Biography

Richard F. Teichgraeber III is Professor History at Tulane University, and served as the Director of the Murphy Institute from 1984 to 2009. He is the author of Building Culture: Studies in the Intellectual History of Industrializing America, 1867-1910 (2010); Sublime Thoughts/Penny Wisdom: Situating Emerson and Thoreau in the American Marketplace (1995) and “Free Trade” and Moral Philosophy: Rethinking the Sources of Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations (1986); and co-editor (with Thomas L. Haskell) of The Culture of the Market: Historical Essays (1993). His publications also include numerous other essays and reviews.

Teichgraeber’s current teaching and research interests focus on late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American cultural history, especially the growth and consolidation of the American university system. Before coming to Tulane in 1979, he was a Teaching and Research Fellow in the Department of History at Stanford University, and has been the recipient of research fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies.

In 1989, he was named Louisiana Professor of the Year by the Council for the Advancement of Secondary Education, and has won numerous awards for excellence in teaching while at Tulane. Teichgraeber received his B.A. from Amherst College, and his Ph.D. from Brandeis University.

Publications

Books

Articles/Chapters in Books/Review Articles:

Reviews

The Murphy Institute

Established in memory of Charles H. Murphy, Sr. (1870-1954), and inspired by the vision of Charles H. Murphy, Jr. (1920-2002), the Murphy Institute exists to help Tulane faculty and students understand economic, moral, and political problems we all face and think about. More important, it exists to help us understand how these problems have come to be so closely interconnected.